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Nigerian-born British Athlete, Ohuruogu Cleared Of Anti-doping Violation –

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Nigerian-born British Athlete, Ohuruogu Cleared Of Anti-doping Violation -

British sprinter Victoria Ohuruogu said on Thursday that she had been cleared of an anti-doping violation relating to an alleged prohibited association with a banned athlete. She is of Nigerian parentage, though born in the United Kingdom.

Ohuruogu, 31, was allegedly being coached by her Italian boyfriend Antonio Infantino, whose three-year doping ban ends in December, but this was dismissed by a UK Anti-Doping panel.

“An independent panel has emphatically dismissed the charge of prohibited association against me, finding that it was ‘not satisfied, let alone comfortably satisfied’ that I have broken any rules,” Ohuruogu told ITV News on Thursday.

“I take my anti-doping obligations extremely seriously and am pleased that the truth of the matter – which is exactly as I have always maintained – has now been confirmed.”

British 400 metres champion Ohuruogu, who will aim to qualify for this year’s Paris Olympics, added that despite the ruling the time away from the track came at a cost.

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“It has … cost me the chance to run in what would have been career-defining events (including in a World Championship bronze medal winning team), and caused huge disruption to my preparation and training in an Olympic year,” she said.

“I’m now eager to put this firmly behind me, get my head down, and train hard for the outdoor season and – hopefully – the Olympics. The GB team is very strong, and I hope to be able to contribute to its continued success.”

Ohuruogu was left out of Britain’s relay team at the 2023 World Championships in Budapest, having helped the country to a 4x400m relay bronze at the World and European Championships in 2022, although she did compete in the individual event.

-Reuters

 

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Kunle Solaja is the author of landmark books on sports and journalism as well as being a multiple award-winning journalist and editor of long standing. He is easily Nigeria’s foremost soccer diarist and Africa's most capped FIFA World Cup journalist, having attended all FIFA World Cup finals from Italia ’90 to Qatar 2022. He was honoured at the Qatar 2022 World Cup by FIFA and AIPS.

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WADA Suspends Africa’s Only Anti-doping Laboratory –

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WADA Suspends Africa's Only Anti-doping Laboratory -

The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) has suspended the accreditation of South Africa’s Bloemfontein Anti-Doping Laboratory, the only accredited laboratory in Africa, for “multiple non-conformities” with international standards.

WADA has announced that it has suspended the accreditation of Africa’s only accredited anti-doping laboratory from 1 March, due to “multiple non-compliances” to meet international standards. In a statement, WADA said it had suspended the accreditation of the South African Anti-Doping Laboratory in Bloemfontein for up to six months.

The Bloemfontein laboratory had already been placed under some restrictions in September last year, while other anti-doping activities were allowed to continue.

However, WADA said that experts had advised the agency to suspend the facility’s accreditation due to “multiple non-conformities with the International Standard for Laboratories”. WADA said the Bloemfontein laboratory had accepted the suspension, which came into effect on 1 March.

“The suspension … prohibits the laboratory from conducting any anti-doping activities, including the analysis of urine and blood samples, with the exception of analyses related to the haematology module of the Athlete Biological Passport,” WADA said in a statement.

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WADA said the laboratory will be allowed to apply for reinstatement once it has demonstrated that all identified “non-conformities” have been addressed.

As a result, testing must be conducted at another accredited laboratory during the suspension period. Samples awaiting analysis, samples undergoing confirmation procedures, and any samples for which an Adverse Analytical Finding has been reported must be sent to another WADA-accredited laboratory for analysis.

“This is to ensure the continued high quality of sample analysis, which will also help to maintain athletes’ confidence in the process and the anti-doping system as a whole,” WADA concluded.

This sanction comes at a time when WADA is implementing the Athlete Engagement and Anti-Doping Legacy programmes at the 2023 African Games to promote clean sport during the 2023 African Games in Accra, Ghana. WADA will have its Athlete Engagement and Major Event Legacy (MEAL) teams present at the Games, which will be held from 8 to 23 March 2024.

The 13th edition of the Games will see over 5,000 athletes from around 50 countries compete in 30 sports. Before the start of the African Games, the African Union Commission (AUC), with the support of WADA, will host a high-level forum on anti-doping in sport on 7 March 2024.

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The Forum will be attended by African Ministers of Sport and other senior government officials, leaders of the African sports movement, Regional Anti-Doping Organisations (RADOs), National Anti-Doping Organisations (NADOs) and other clean sport stakeholders. The event will serve as a consultation and information exchange, as well as an opportunity to network and develop anti-doping policies across the continent.

Rodney Swigelaar, Director of WADA’s Africa Office, said: “The Anti-Doping Forum to be held during the African Games promises to be powerful. It is important to assess and discuss anti-doping issues and to consider African solutions to doping problems in an African context. The workshop will provide another opportunity to promote the work to develop the capacity of anti-doping programmes.”

“The Athlete Engagement Team, led by African athletes, will have the important task of interacting with athletes and their support staff throughout the event. The MEAL programme will play a role in connecting with anti-doping professionals and strengthening the capacity of anti-doping organisations in the region.” The team includes athletes such as Ganzi Semu Mugala (Uganda), Ngon Ntama (Cameroon), Khotso Mokoena (South Africa) and Nathalie Bashala (Democratic Republic of Congo).

The MEAL programme aims to provide quality support to the various stakeholders involved in the delivery of the Games’ anti-doping programme. It focuses on supporting the development of anti-doping programmes by Major Event Organizations and other key stakeholders, while promoting clean sport in regions of the world where anti-doping activities are limited, such as Africa.

Specific actions include: supporting the training of local DCOs (16 DCOs, 20 chaperones, 23 coaches); supporting the participation of 15 international DCOs and other experts from the continent to increase knowledge in the region and build bridges for future editions of the Games; strengthening the structures and operations of the African Union Commission as a new signatory to the WADA Code; and providing an in-country advisory team to support the implementation of the anti-doping programme.

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WADA suspends Africa’s only anti-doping laboratory –

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WADA Suspends Africa's Only Anti-doping Laboratory -

The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) has suspended the accreditation of South Africa’s Bloemfontein Anti-Doping Laboratory, the only accredited laboratory in Africa, for “multiple non-conformities” with international standards.

WADA has announced that it has suspended the accreditation of Africa’s only accredited anti-doping laboratory from 1 March, due to “multiple non-compliances” to meet international standards. In a statement, WADA said it had suspended the accreditation of the South African Anti-Doping Laboratory in Bloemfontein for up to six months.

The Bloemfontein laboratory had already been placed under some restrictions in September last year, while other anti-doping activities were allowed to continue.

However, WADA said that experts had advised the agency to suspend the facility’s accreditation due to “multiple non-conformities with the International Standard for Laboratories”. WADA said the Bloemfontein laboratory had accepted the suspension, which came into effect on 1 March.

“The suspension … prohibits the laboratory from conducting any anti-doping activities, including the analysis of urine and blood samples, with the exception of analyses related to the haematology module of the Athlete Biological Passport,” WADA said in a statement.

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WADA said the laboratory will be allowed to apply for reinstatement once it has demonstrated that all identified “non-conformities” have been addressed.

As a result, testing must be conducted at another accredited laboratory during the suspension period. Samples awaiting analysis, samples undergoing confirmation procedures, and any samples for which an Adverse Analytical Finding has been reported must be sent to another WADA-accredited laboratory for analysis.

“This is to ensure the continued high quality of sample analysis, which will also help to maintain athletes’ confidence in the process and the anti-doping system as a whole,” WADA concluded.

This sanction comes at a time when WADA is implementing the Athlete Engagement and Anti-Doping Legacy programmes at the 2023 African Games to promote clean sport during the 2023 African Games in Accra, Ghana. WADA will have its Athlete Engagement and Major Event Legacy (MEAL) teams present at the Games, which will be held from 8 to 23 March 2024.

The 13th edition of the Games will see over 5,000 athletes from around 50 countries compete in 30 sports. Before the start of the African Games, the African Union Commission (AUC), with the support of WADA, will host a high-level forum on anti-doping in sport on 7 March 2024.

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The Forum will be attended by African Ministers of Sport and other senior government officials, leaders of the African sports movement, Regional Anti-Doping Organisations (RADOs), National Anti-Doping Organisations (NADOs) and other clean sport stakeholders. The event will serve as a consultation and information exchange, as well as an opportunity to network and develop anti-doping policies across the continent.

Rodney Swigelaar, Director of WADA’s Africa Office, said: “The Anti-Doping Forum to be held during the African Games promises to be powerful. It is important to assess and discuss anti-doping issues and to consider African solutions to doping problems in an African context. The workshop will provide another opportunity to promote the work to develop the capacity of anti-doping programmes.”

“The Athlete Engagement Team, led by African athletes, will have the important task of interacting with athletes and their support staff throughout the event. The MEAL programme will play a role in connecting with anti-doping professionals and strengthening the capacity of anti-doping organisations in the region.” The team includes athletes such as Ganzi Semu Mugala (Uganda), Ngon Ntama (Cameroon), Khotso Mokoena (South Africa) and Nathalie Bashala (Democratic Republic of Congo).

The MEAL programme aims to provide quality support to the various stakeholders involved in the delivery of the Games’ anti-doping programme. It focuses on supporting the development of anti-doping programmes by Major Event Organizations and other key stakeholders, while promoting clean sport in regions of the world where anti-doping activities are limited, such as Africa.

Specific actions include: supporting the training of local DCOs (16 DCOs, 20 chaperones, 23 coaches); supporting the participation of 15 international DCOs and other experts from the continent to increase knowledge in the region and build bridges for future editions of the Games; strengthening the structures and operations of the African Union Commission as a new signatory to the WADA Code; and providing an in-country advisory team to support the implementation of the anti-doping programme.

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Nigeria’s Anti-doping Chief Keeps Mum For Now –

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Nigeria’s Anti-doping Chief Keeps Mum For Now -

BY KUNLE SOLAJA.

 

The head of the Nigeria’s  National Anti-Doping Organization (NADO), Prof. Ken. Anugweje says he has no comment to make to the public for now following the World Anti Doping Agency (WADA) dragging the country to the Court of Arbitration for Sports (CAS).

2023 Nigeria NADO Consequences

The consequence of WADA’s action is that Nigeria’s flag is not to be displayed at any sporting event – continental and global – from Tuesday when WADA announced its decision.

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Consequently, except drastic actions are taken, Nigeria’s flag will not be displayed at the African Games that begin in Accra on March 8. The same will be applied to other sporting events, especially the Olympic Games in Paris in July/August.

 

By WADA’s action which means Nigeria is not anti-doping compliance, the country will not be allowed to host any championship.

Prof. Anugweje who is also the director of University of Port Harcourt Sports Institute in a message to Sports Village Square remarked that since the WADA/Nigeria dispute is at the Court of Arbitration for Sport, “I am unable to make any public statements about it.

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“At the appropriate time, I will provide you with sufficient information on the matter.”

 

Hameed Adio, a former captain of the Nigerian team to the 1980 Olympics remarked on a WhatsApp platform of Nigerian Olympians: “That’s the result of treating important issues with kid gloves.

 

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“If we are eventually sanctioned, I can’t imagine the negative psychological effect this will have on the innocent athletes who have spent several months preparing for these Games.”

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